Salvador DalíLobster Telephone 1936

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Artwork details

Artist
Salvador Dalí (1904‑1989)
Title
Lobster Telephone
Téléphone - Homard
Date 1936
MediumSteel, plaster, rubber, resin and paper
Dimensionsobject: 178 x 330 x 178 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition Purchased 1981
Reference
T03257
Not on display

Summary

This is a classic example of a Surrealist object, made from the conjunction of items not normally associated with each other, resulting in something both playful and menacing. Dalí believed that such objects could reveal the secret desires of the unconscious. Lobsters and telephones had strong sexual connotations for Dalí. The telephone appears in certain paintings of the late 1930s such as Mountain Lake (Tate Gallery ), and the lobster appears in drawings and designs, usually associated with erotic pleasure and pain. For the 1939 New York World's Fair, Dalí created a multi-media experience entitled The Dream of Venus, which consisted in part of dressing live nude models in 'costumes' made of fresh seafood, an event photographed by Horst P. Horst and George Platt Lynes. A lobster was used by the artist to cover the female sexual organs of his models. Dalí often drew a close analogy between food and sex… (read more)

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Sculpture (1,944)

Decade

1930-9 (1,032)

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